Tagged: worms

Itchy Occupations: On Parasites

My essay “Itchy Occupations: Toward a Theory of Parasitic Writing” is now out in New Theory, a new journal of inter/crossdisciplinary art and thought. It thinks through the metaphor of “parasitic” writing from a queer biopolitical perspective. Here’s an excerpt:

A parasitic mode of writing is organized around imposition, infection, and itch. It sucks, it burrows, it produces chronic irritation. In contrast to the pure machine of conceptual writing, parasitic writing insists on impurity, transcorporeality, bad boundaries. It is a minoritarian mode, exploiting power asymmetries and enacting imposition: the self-body-text—understood in a post-Enlightenment western context to be bounded, sovereign, impermeable—recognized as permeable; violable.

This essay went through MANY DRAFTS! …

… My interest in the parasite as a figure of possibility for writing emerged from my experiments in appropriative writing as well as my experiences with parasitic infections, which included two rounds of scabies and a summer of bedbugs, all in a fairly short rush of time. During this time I developed an intimacy with my parasites. My scabies mites, for example—I’m using the possessive pronoun, they were mine, were part of me—and they were also a symptom, or evidence, of my participation in queer sex culture. My mites were bred from sexual intimacy, they had breached bodily boundaries, they were reproducing inside of us. My then-partner and I called our scabies our gaybies. I was proud of them, their tenacious circulation through various bodies in my community.

scabies_s1a_mite

At the same time, they were eating us from the inside, leaving behind a miserable itch. Itching is reproductive, regenerating itself; you might scratch to stop the itch, but doing so only revives it—which is why we often use the word “itch” as a verb meaning “to scratch”—they are the same thing.

Is itching pain, or is it—something else? Heightened sensitivity? New awareness? In Ugly Feelings, Sianne Ngai explores the political valence of irritation, which, she says, “might be described as negative affect in its weakest, mildest, and most politically effete form” (181). Looking at Nella Larsen’s Quicksand, she analyzes the chronic irritation experienced—and provoked—by Helga, a young woman of mixed race and mixed nationality moving through various settings during the Harlem Renaissance. In Ngai’s reading, Helga’s irritation irritates the reader because it is always there: despite encountering what we might consider minor and major instances of racism and sexism, Helga registers them all as equally, vaguely annoying. Their effects come to the surface not as expressive outrage but affective rash, a mild allergic reaction to which Ngai confers political valence.

Following Ngai: what it would mean to irritate a text in a more parasitic fashion, that is, to burrow inside it like a scabies mite, to eat it from the inside, to make it itch?

[bring in Derrida and Lippit on animetaphor, animals exceeding language?]

the-strain-last-rites-vampire

Yes, all of this got cut.

Over the past few years while writing and rewriting this essay (while doing many other things!) I have read quite a few books on parasites. In addition to those cited in my essay, I will take this opportunity to shout out Rebecca Adams Wright’s brilliant short story “What to Expect When You’re Expecting an Alien Parasite.”

Also Mira Grant’s Parasite (#1 in the Parasitology Trilogy), which is NOT v good, tbh, but for the following exchange of dialogue, which gave me light when things got dark:

“Sherman? You’re really a tapeworm? You’ve been–”

“I’ve been a tapeworm the entire time you’ve known me, pet.”

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Moments of Clarity 1-4

The following pieces work with language from the book Moments of Clarity: Daily Affirmations from Dr. Holly by Holly Hatcher-Frazier (best known as the voice of reason on the reality show Dance Moms). I’ve been wanting to work with this text for some time. This set originated from exercises in Lauren Russell’s poetry workshop. More to come.

#1.

Worms are important and powerful. Be careful with the worms you choose. Worms can be used as weapons and worms can comfort. Take responsibility for the worms that you use. Think about your worm choice. Do not be impulsive with your worms. Worms survive.

#2.

Words! Illness and pox. Be carsick with the words you chuck. Words can be upheaved as wetness and words can common cold. Take rest for the words that you upheave. Thank your word chuck. Do not be immunodeficient with your words. Once a word is spumed you cannot talc it back. Words swell long after they are soaking.

#3.

I’m gay and powerfuck. Be cartouche bag. Weanus and comfart. Do not be impussible. A word is spoogami; you cannot take it backwards. Words survivor’s guilt long after they are spokescunt.